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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 32  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 88-93

Ophthalmology training in Greece as perceived by resident ophthalmologists in the times of crisis: A national, questionnaire-based survey


2nd Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Macedonia, Greece

Correspondence Address:
Ioannis Tsinopoulos
2nd Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki Ring Road, 564 03 Thessaloniki, Macedonia
Greece
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.1016/j.joco.2019.10.001

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Purpose: To assess the level of perceived satisfaction with the current level of ophthalmology training in Greece from the perspective of residents and to identify deficiencies in the training curriculum. Methods: This is a prospective, cross-sectional questionnaire-based study. An online, semi-structured questionnaire was designed to evaluate ophthalmology residents' extent of satisfaction with the quality of their postgraduate medical training. The survey was divided in two parts: demographics and evaluation of training. Resident ophthalmologists in all teaching hospitals in Greece were contacted and encouraged to complete it. Results: A response rate of 53.8% was achieved. Two out of three participants stated their disappointment with the quality of training they received and deemed the four-year residency training program as insufficient. Surgical training was also viewed as unsatisfactory by the majority of the respondents. An interest in subspecialty training, as well as a significant participation in research activities, was noted. Conclusions: Both training and overall satisfaction with working conditions must be improved to preserve the appeal of ophthalmology for young academics. A new, structured curriculum, reduction of unnecessary bureaucracy, and improved surgical training rank among the most essential priorities in order to improve postgraduate ophthalmology training.


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